All organizations are seeking to continuously improve the efficiency, speed, and quality of software delivery. We wanted to find out what approaches and technologies (aimed at increasing capacity) organizations had invested in over the past year. Among the approaches organizations had invested in, agile and DevOps stood apart from the pack at 60% and 40% respectively.

 

Agile Maturity

We wanted not only to understand whether organizations were investing in agile, but also to gauge the progress of these practices. So, we asked respondents to assess their level of agile adoption using this five-level maturity model.

Agile Maturity Model:

  • Level 1Initial: We lack consistency and need training to get everyone aligned.
  • Level 2Just Started: Processes not fully defined. Basic level of agile adoption. Development and testing are not fully in sync yet.
  • Level 3Defined: Our whole team is using well-defined agile processes, and we’re consistently delivering spring after sprint.
  • Level 4Measured: We’re measuring code quality and other key measures. Our focus is on engineering maturity.
  • Level 5Optimizing: We develop on schedule and release on demand. We’ve invested in automation for continuous integration and deployment. Consistent delivery across teams. Self-organized, sustainable, continuous improvement based on KPIs.

The average response was 2.6; meaning typically respondents said their agile maturity was somewhere between “Just Started” and “Defined”.

We compared results between organizations that were and were not using low-code. As shown below, users of low-code rated their agile maturity slightly higher than organizations that were not using low-code.

DevOps Maturity

We wanted not only to understand whether organizations were investing in DevOps, but also to gauge the progress of these practices. So, we asked respondents to assess their level of DevOps adoption using this five-level maturity model.

DevOps Maturity Model:

  • Level 1Not Started: Outages, war-rooms, blame, unplanned work, delays, and defects.
  • Level 2Starting: Thinking about cultural change, starting to write scripts, looking at test automation.
  • Level 3Fundamental: Automated build, cross-functional teams, product-focused, cultural change is underway.
  • Level 4Managed: Happy people, integrated tool chain that preempts failure, automated test and deployment, continuous delivery.
  • Level 5Optimizing: DevOps is done, fine-tuned, and tied tightly to business goals.

The average response was 2.4; meaning respondents typically said their DevOps maturity was somewhere between “Starting” and “Fundamental”.

We compared results between organizations that were and were not using low-code. As shown below, users of low-code rated their DevOps maturity slightly higher than organizations that were not using low-code.